Texas Drivers Education – Existing Programs and Most Up-to-Date Amendments

Texas drivers education consists of a series of procedures suitable for everybody – private or commercial drivers ed instructors, parent-taught programs, driver courses for adults, traditional or internet based programs, but you are supposed to be aware of the fact that every driver training instructor, school or course supplier is, regardless being private or commercial, has to be certified by the Driver Training Division and the Texas Department of Public Safety.

One has to meet the legal requirements so as to earn a driving license – your age should be at least 16 or, if not, having used the learner’ s authorization for a minimum of 6 months; that is why, a lot of teens initiate their legal driving education at the age of 15, so that before being aged 16, having a lot of time to drive under the attention of a tutor.

There are particular patterns you need to be concerned about before enrolling in a driving school’ s courses, regarding driving regulations and conditions, new amendments and laws:

* every new driver in Texas driving education courses must earn more experience in driving before becoming a legal driver (81st Texas legislature, Less Tears More Years Act, from September 1, 2009) Young drivers have to receive a supplementary 20 hours of driving time, therefore increasing the compulsory driving hours from 14 to 34. These hours have to be certified by a tutor or guardian before a young driver may proceed to stage 2 of Texas’ Graduated Driver Licensing program, and must add a minimum of ten hours at nighttime. This amendment is relevant to both parent taught and common Texas drivers education course.

* also, Driving Bill 2730, effective since September 1, 2009 denotes that all drivers under 18 years old must complete a driving test, meaning that once you complete a Texas drivers education course, you have to take a drivers test at your local DPS office so as to receive your drivers license;

* as outlined by the law, if you are a student that has applied for the Parent-Taught Driver Education Course before November 1, 2009 and hasn’ t earned the driving license yet, the Department of Public Safety in Texas will permit you to finish the course, but you are not able to attend Course 101 if you registered in or after November 1, 2009;

* according to the Texas law, persons aged between 18 and 25 who wish to become authorized drivers have to complete a six hour driver education program exclusively designed for adults or finish a minor and adult driver education course that is component of the Texas drivers instruction course (effective March 1, 2010); Texas drivers education is composed by two differentiated instruction departments: behind-the-wheel instruction and drivers ed coursework.

The parent-taught program is addressed to teens aged between 14 and 17, deals with both student and parent, and the tutor or guardian must monitor in-car driving and sign-off the completion of each objective. A teen applicant for a Texas drivers education program is able to initiate the training at the age of 14, but is not able to achieve the learner’ s authorization before age.

Driver Education Games

Driver education games are fun and informative and a good practice ground for students. While playing games, students are able to test their driving skill and knowledge and also find out where their weak points are. The games are useful because the students learn proper driving methods and techniques without actually putting themselves in harms way.

There are two types of games that can be played – one is the simple quiz game that test driving knowledge. Students can choose from a series of quizzes on various topics. This is a challenging way to test what students have learned in the driver education program, and it also prepare them for their driver tests.

Each question comes with multiple choices, and students will be given their score along with the correct answers at the end of the game. There are plenty of website where students can register for these quizzes and get results instantly.

Video games and simulation is another driver’s education activity. These games put students behind the wheel. By using certain controls, they can drive the car and progress to different levels. Scoring a certain amount of points allows the student to move on to the next level until the highest level is reached. At the same time, students can easily lose the game if they make mistakes. The graphics are very realistic and the games can be quite challenging. Video games are so much fun that parents play with their kids and see how well their children have grasped the concepts of driving. These games include stopping at signals, changing lanes, making turns, recognizing road signs, parallel parking, merging with traffic, parking and backing out of a parking space and so on.

In virtual driving simulation games students can practice driving in a virtual environment. Sitting behind the wheel, players must make their way through busy streets, highways and intersections and make real decisions. This is an excellent way for students to practice and prepare for their driver’s test.

Driver’s Education Books

Most students prefer online courses to classes being offered in school when it comes to driver education. However, for those who cannot afford these online classes, driver education books would be a good option.

These books have earned some rave reviews from people who have actually used them. They offer complete information and keep the reader’s interest with colorful illustrations. The content is approved by the state and can be bought from the nearest DMV. Some books can be bought on the Internet also and are written by private authors. Even though these books are also very interesting, many might prefer to buy the book from the DMV instead of outside, keeping in view the difference in the cost between the two varieties of education books.

Most driver education books provide very clear and precise text and are well written. A book that provides a program that helps students manage the risks and responsibilities of driving might be a good alternative to a regular course.

Books such as 110 CAR AND DRIVING EMERGENCIES provide quick answers to any problem a driver might possibly face, whether it’s mechanical, electrical, weather, or an on-the-road hazard. It is a book that shows how to deal with minor problems or major hazards calmly, either in the driveway or garage or on the road far away from home. These books can fit easily in a car’s glove compartment for easy access.

Some books provide interesting information even to experienced drivers in brief informative chapters. They help in situations where the driver needs to handle difficult driving situations, and how to deal with an emergency such as fender benders, tire changes, and overheated engines. These books are user-friendly and make reading even the most boring topics seem interesting.